Featured Articles: Volume 5:2
Volume 5:2

Spend a few days talking to the rheumatologists at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and, guaranteed, you walk away greatly impressed. There are many words one can use to try to summarize this large rheumatology division, but it turns out a very good one is simply this: Power.

Volume 5:2

Results from comparative effectiveness research (CER) are of growing importance in the current health care debate. Patients, providers and policymakers are demanding better information on whether a given intervention not only works but also which is the “best” intervention for a given patient.

Volume 5:2

Despite the huge amount of money and narcotics used to treat pain, 40% of chronic pain patients do not achieve adequate pain relief. Adjuvant nonopioid medications can reduce both pain symptoms and opiate requirements, but fewer than 15% of chronic pain patients use them.

Volume 5:2

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disease driven by autoantibodies and an orchestra of immunologically overactive cells that primarily targets synovial joints, as well as extra-articular tissues and organs.

Volume 5:2

Topical administration of anesthetics and analgesics can allow for the efficient, painless delivery of medications that may reduce systemic side effects associated with the medication while providing clinical advantages over injected or oral administration for the same clinical situation.